Lessons from Indigenous to resist the crisis

Lessons from Indigenous to resist the crisis

This moment humanity is going through can now be seen as a portal and as a hole. The decision to fall into the hole or go through the portal is up to you. Lessons from Indigenous to resist the crisis.

If you repent of the problem and consume the news 24 hours a day, with little energy, nervous all the time, with pessimism, you will fall into the hole. But if you take this opportunity to look at yourself, rethink life and death, take care of yourself and others, you will cross the portal. Take care of your homes, take care of your body. Connect with your spiritual House.

When you are taking care of yourselves, you are taking care of everything else. Do not lose the spiritual dimension of this crisis; have the eagle aspect from above and see the whole; see more broadly.

There is a social demand in this crisis, but there is also a spiritual demand — the two go hand in hand. Without the social dimension, we fall into fanaticism. But without the spiritual dimension, we fall into pessimism and lack of meaning.

You were prepared to go through this crisis. Take your toolbox and use all the tools available to you.

This is a resistance strategy. In shamanism, there is a rite of passage called the quest for vision. You spend a few days alone in the forest, without water, without food, without protection. When you cross this portal, you get a new vision of the world, because you have faced your fears, your difficulties.

This is what is asked of you: Allow yourself to take advantage of this time to perform your vision-seeking rituals.

What world do you want to build for you? For now, this is what you can do, serenity in the storm. Calm down, pray every day. Establish a routine to meet the sacred every day. Good things emanate; what you emanate now is the most important thing. And sing, dance, resist through art, joy, faith, and love.

Learn about the resistance of the indigenous and African peoples; we have always been, and continue to be, exterminated. But we still haven’t stopped singing, dancing, lighting a fire, and having fun. Don’t feel guilty about being happy during this difficult time. You do not help at all being sad and without energy.

You help if good things emanate from the Universe now. It is through joy that one resists. Also, when the storm passes, each of you will be very important in the reconstruction of this new world. You need to be well and strong.

And for that, there is no other way than to maintain a beautiful, happy, and bright vibration. This has nothing to do with alienation.

 

Lessons from Indigenous to resist crisis

White Eagle, Hopi indigenous: Lessons from Indigenous to resist the crisis
White Eagle is the name given to the wise teacher and philosopher who guided the
formation of the White Eagle Lodge. The name White Eagle in the Native American
tradition is symbolic and means a spiritual teacher.

The white eagle soars far into the heavens above the emotions and turmoils of the earth and sees things from a different perspective.
No true spiritual teacher ever makes claims about themselves – they come in simplicity and humility.

Tech vs Mindfulness?

Tech vs Mindfulness?

Coursera, the popular platform of online education, just released the Global Skills 2020 Index (GSI). The index compares the mastery of skills in ten industries and eleven areas of study in 60 countries worldwide, turning Switzerland, Finland and Austria the Cutting Edge Global Skills learners in the world. Tech vs Mindfulness, where should you invest your time and money?

The GSI aims to develop a timely study of the changes that occurred in virtual learning from the consequences generated by the global pandemic. It states that the recovery in a post-pandemic world will rely on broad reskilling.

The report displays global rankings that were developed in core skills in business, technology, and data science. It shows that Switzerland, Finland, Austria, and Russia were the most consistent in the top five countries in the three ranking categories.

By contrast, countries such as Mexico, Venezuela, Peru, Pakistan, and Nigeria are among the most lagging in essential skills in business, technology, and data science.

 Top five innovative countries in essential skills

BUSINESS

  1. 1. Switzerland
  2. 2.  Austria
  3. 3. Denmark
  4. 4. Finland
  5. 5. United Arab Emirates

TECHNOLOGY

  1. 1. Russia
  2. 2. Belarus
  3. 3. Switzerland
  4. 4. Ukraine
  5. 5. Finland

DATA SCIENCE

  1. 1. Russia
  2. 2. Switzerland
  3. 3. Belgium
  4. 4. Austria
  5. 5.  Finland

 In addition to this global ranking of essential skills, the report highlighted the following key ideas:

1. Countries with higher skill proficiencies are also those with higher labour force participation rates. A country’s skill proficiency across domains is positively correlated (56%), with the fraction of its working-age population active in its labour force. (Secondary data: World Bank)

2. Countries with equal internet access rates are also those of higher skill proficiencies. There is a significant and positive correlation (65%) between a country’s skill proficiency across domains and the percentage of its population using the internet. (Secondary data: World Bank).

3. The with more highly skilled talent, especially in technology skills, see higher stock returns and less disruption from COVID-19. The correlation between an industry’s skill proficiency and its stock performance in the United States in one year was 43% across all the domains of skills and 39% in the fields of technology. (Secondary data: Fidelity)

4. Of the 200 million higher education students whose studies were interrupted by COVID-19, 80% are located in countries with emerging or lagging skills. 80 % of the students enrolled in tertiary education are in countries that have closed schools due to COVID-19 and are listed in the bottom half of the world rankings for business, technology, and data science skills. (Secondary data: UNESCO)

Beyond Hard Skills. 

In contrast, the same report shows that the demand for personal development skills such as confidence, stress management, and mindfulness has grown by 1200% among individual learners. People are turning to courses like Yale University’s Science of Well-Being to mitigate mental and emotional distress caused by the pandemic.

I know, there is a looooonngg and passionate discussion on how important humanities will become the most relevant field of study when the AI starts coding and engineering better than humans,

Vs

We should be teaching our toddlers how to code, build robots and develop apps.

However, we will save that conversation for another post. Right now, When we talk about job satisfaction, the same countries rank different, according to the Global Employee Engagement Index.

1. Switzerland. 7.4 / 10

2. Austria. 7.7 / 10

3. Denmark. 7.1 / 10

4. Belgium 7.1 / 10

5. Ukraine. 7 / 10

6. Finland. 6.8 / 10

7. Russia. 6.8 / 10

While the top of the rank belongs to:

1. North-America: USA (7.7 / 10), Canada (7.4 / 10), Mexico (8.2 / 10).

2. South-America: Chile (7.8/10), Perú (7.6 / 10),  Brazil (7.6 / 10), Argentina (7.5 /  10)

3. Europe: Romania (7.9 / 10),  Austria (7.7 / 10), Swtizerland (7.4 / 10), Turkey (7.4 / 10)

4. Africa: Nigeria (7.7 / 10), Kenya (7.4 / 10), South Africa (7.3 / 10)

5. Asia: India (7.9 / 10), Thailand (7.6 / 10), Indonesia (7.4 / 10).

Several surveys of across the world acknowledge the imperative of pack the workforce with more than hard skills. Even some employers identify lack of soft skills as the area where young job-seekers have the largest deficiency, with growing evidence that non-cognitive or soft skills are important for a range of life outcomes.

As a result, a growing number of youth programs have incorporated a soft skills training component – examples include the entra 21 program in 18 Latin American countries, or the Jordan NOW program.

But how do we measure what soft skills youth have? Let us share with you 5 tools that can help you out:

1. The World Bank STEP skills measurement exercise employs such an approach in multiple countries, measuring personality traits, grit, and behavior skills.

2. The 16 personalities test is a funny and interactive tool to explore more about yourself and what drives you.

3. Social Style Matrix. An effective method to understand how both you, and the people you need to work with, think and make decisions.

4. The Global Talent Trends series of post by Linkedin invited experts on. the topic Soft Skills, Dr John Sulivan summarizes 12 ways of assessing soft skills. 

Tech vs Mindfulness? Instead:  Mind, Body Soul. 

At The Global School for New Leadership, we use a great tool called “Purpose-Driven Leader Self-Assessment”, a holistic approach on personal leadership and impact beyond work or professional purpose, it´s more about what really balance your life-purpose as a leader.

Social Innovation Box

You can also take a look at the recommendations of Gifted Healthcare.

Happiness of Europe - Roberto A. Arrucha

Roberto A. Arrucha 

I work with Purpose-Driven Organizations & Entrepreneurs in 3 main challenges:  1. Powerful & Meaningful Communication, 2. Income Generation & Marketing, 3. Holistic Leadership.

Director & Founder of The Global School for New Leadership 

Happiness is expensive

Happiness is expensive

Have you also seen the exponential surge of Wellness and Wellbeing courses, coaches, workshop, retreats, etc.?

COVID-19 is forcing us to rethink our wellbeing, however, we have crashed to the wall: Happiness is expensive, this is the case of Europe.

For some of us who come from the global south, we find the concept of happiness as a commodity, extremely weird and complex, more related to the industrialised world than a universal value. Now, everyone wants access to happiness, but none dare to challenge the status quo of an accumulation based society anxious by consumerism:

Like working out harder to lose weight but keep eating pizza every night.

 You are paying more for “happiness” than taxes. 

Recently, a study was released about how expensive is Happiness in Europe, published by Mckinsey: The pandemic’s negative impact on well-being in April was up to 3.5 times the losses experienced in GDP; This means, for every euro lost due to the economic burden, 3 euros were lost due to life-dissatisfaction. 1

For example, If you are earning a salary of 2,700 euros per month, the economic collapse due to COVID-19 wiped out on average 540 euros of that salary, but your life-dissatisfaction wiped out 1,620 euros, transforming your real salary into 1,080 euros per month or a cut of 60% of your salary! 1

Happiness of Europe

Happiness is expensive in Europe and getting more and more expensive. If you embed this, into the ecological footprint of every European country, consuming 3 up to 9 countries available resources, or per capita: 2.8 planets for satisfying the European consumer 2, turns out that European happiness is expensive, luxury, exclusive and an unsustainable goal, near 10 times more expensive than any other human in the world (Except USAmericans).

Furthermore, if you consider the high addiction of alcohol and drugs in Europe, 200% higher than in the global south countries 3, you start to draw a better picture of the problem:

OurExpensive, Destructive and Non-sustainable life-dissatisfaction for ourselves and the planet.

 What about the world happiness report? Well, it just confirms it. 

Even the WHP, where Europe ranks on top, acknowledges this: Industrialised societies relies mainly on GDP and income for their life-satisfaction, reducing happiness to a simple commodity.

Unlike the Happy Planet Index, placing our ecological footprint and personal wellbeing as the key components of life satisfaction, ranking on top the countries close to the Ecuador.

One more interesting ranking is the Gross National Happiness from Buthan, you can read more about this amazing concept in a post shared by my friend Jurgen Nagler, UNDP head in Buthan. 

 Are we ready for a shift? 

Communities around the world are begging rich countries to reduce consumption, and learn how to live happier and sustainably, like the campaign from the Himalayas #ILiveSimply, where people highly hit by climate change, are joining to call the world in a single shot out:

“Please live simply, so others can simply live¨ 

Now we see funded research, training, certifications, workshops, etc. An army of persons is trying to incorporate wellbeing to their everyday life, but at the same time, they find themselves caught in a complex system based on high consumption fuelled by an anxious economy.

As a foreigner in this land, I often face the same feeling when another foreigner goes to my country and I find out that people still buy water in plastic bottles for survival.

Water is a human right, and it should be available cost-free. Can happiness be considered as essential as water for our existence?

I want to believe that all this wellbeing, wellness and happiness movement in Europe and industrial countries are based in an inside-out transformation for the well of our relationship with ourselves and our planet, but numbers say otherwise, maybe moments of happiness will become another commodity in this accumulation-based society.

In only a few weeks of reduced physical exercise, heightened stress and anxiety, limited access to diagnostics and care are likely to have longer-term health consequences for every European resident, which eventually will turn out in a public health issue and a priority for policymakers.

How can policymakers design real wellbeing policies after a long tradition of enlightenment and individual responsibility?

How can governments think not only beyond GDP but activities, incentives and metrics for a mentally healthy society? Is possible a European policy on living happily with less? Happiness is expensive and is getting out of control.

Furthermore, how can Europe think about holistic development and personal wellbeing in the middle of a technological war where Europe has decided to stand up and oil the economic machinery as a geopolitical strategy, putting even more pressure to its taxpayers (aka citizens). 

It´s an unknown territory where there is no book or manual written, where it´s finally time to open our minds into a more holistic approach on the development, more human and less economical, on how other cultures live more prosperous with less impact in their mental health and the health of the planet.

 A New Formula of Happiness. Our development framework. 

After more than 10 years of working in more than 20 countries across 4 continents, and having a sensitive understanding of what the most satisfying cultures have in common,

I have summed them up in 3 easy goals: the Humanity Development Goals (HDGs), an inside-out invitation to rethink development in a holistic way rather than a single policy intervention. The HDGs complement and go beyond The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). 

This framework, along with our Purpose-Driven Leadership methodology, is the reason why The Global School and our global community of Consultants & Educator have been awarded and recognised for: An holistic, post-colonised, friendly and realistic approach to sustainable development for all.

Happiness of Europe - The Human Development Goals

Roberto A. Arrucha - Purpose-Driven Consultant

Roberto A. Arrucha 

Director & Founder of The Global School for Social Leaders 

Sources:

1. Mckinsey Group. Report: Well-being in Europe: Addressing the high cost of COVID-19 on life satisfaction: https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-insights/europe/well-being-in-europe-addressing-the-high-cost-of-covid-19-on-life-satisfaction
2. Footprint Network Report 2019.
3. Our World in Data. https://www.footprintnetwork.org/content/uploads/2019/05/WWF_GFN_EU_Overshoot_Day_report.pdf

How to Explain Systems Change to a 13-Year-Old

How to Explain Systems Change to a 13-Year-Old

Innovation requires bringing people and ideas together. But sometimes the way we communicate about our work can get in the way of collaboration. Systems Change Explained:

Eilidh is 13-year-old burgeoning expert in systems change. Just ask her.

“A system is anything organized for a purpose—kind of like my school,” she said. “And a systems map is a visual of how things are connected and work together. We can use it to understand and improve that set of things, which can improve people’s lives.”

“A system is anything organized for a purpose—kind of like my school.”

Full disclosure: Eilidh didn’t develop this definition completely by herself. She and her classmates spent about an hour last week working with 60 leaders in innovation—listening, learning and asking questions about the value of innovative tools like systems mapping. Systems Change Explained

The occasion was the “Building Innovation Into Social Impact Work” convening in Rome. Sponsored by The Rockefeller Foundation, the convening brought together 60 leaders in innovation to discuss innovation tools, how they can be applied and how they need to be refined.

The tools under discussion—systems mapping, horizon scanning, scenario planning, social innovation labs, and others—hold the powerful potential to help us look at problems in new ways and identify opportunities for innovation. They can also sound a little intimidating.

That can have real consequences for our ability to create impact. The backbone of innovation is collaboration: To find innovative solutions, we need to bring people and ideas together, often in unexpected ways.

To change systems, we have to work with governments, the private sector, and academia. If we want to collaborate productively with these partners, we have to communicate clearly about the innovative process.

“The backbone of innovation is collaboration: To find innovative solutions, we need to bring people and ideas together, often in unexpected ways.”

So one of our first tasks in Rome was to explain how innovation tools work—using plain language. As a thought exercise, the workshop facilitators asked us how we would explain each tool to an adolescent. A moment later, Eilidh and her classmates walked in, and we realized they meant the exercise quite literally.

We split up into diverse teams that included philanthropists, government donors, social entrepreneurs, engineers, designers—and children like Eilidh. Our team volunteered to explain the idea of systems mapping and Systems Change Explained.

As we began to describe what a system is, Eilidh quickly compared it to the way her school works. Using that analogy, the abstract idea of systems maps became much more concrete. We discussed the people who influence her “system”—parents, teachers, principals, and other students.

She talked about the issues within the system that she’d like to address—physical activity time, school day length, and the curriculum. And we mapped out her school “system” on a whiteboard, noting how different elements of the school affect each other and where someone would have to start if they wanted to change it.

While the language we use to describe tools like systems mapping can be complex, the ideas were straightforward for Eilidh. For example, she called out the parts of the system that were sensitive to others—more physical education time could mean less English instruction.

She noted the parts of the system that were rigid—her International Baccalaureate program is highly structured and puts constraints on the rest of the curriculum.

And she noted the power dynamics between actors. “Parents have power because we’re their kids. The teachers have power because we’re their students,” she said. “But students don’t have much of a say.”

Other experts at the workshop faced the task of crafting adolescent-friendly descriptions of similarly daunting tools—rapid prototyping, design thinking, accelerators, and incubators. Most found that the exercise wasn’t just child’s play. It helped us communicate with each other more clearly—and that’s the first step to collaboration.

 

When we shared lessons learned, a few actionable ideas rose to the top:

1. Break abstract ideas down into actions. It’s often easier to understand a tool if we describe how it works, rather than what it is. We believe innovation is deliberate practice, so it follows that we should articulate the actions that make up that practice.

Use concrete examples. Most social innovation tools are forged through experience—iteration, collaboration, and revision. So we shouldn’t hesitate to use specific examples to help bring their value to life.

2. Beware of double meanings & assumptions. The terms we use to describe tools can have different meanings to people from different backgrounds. A “system map” can have slightly different qualities to a designer than it does to a social entrepreneur.

When collaborating with partners, we shouldn’t assume that everyone embraces the same definition of key ideas.

3. After the exercise, Eilidh and her classmates went back to school (for their teacher’s sake, we hope none were too inspired to “disrupt systems” right away). But they helped us realize an important lesson: collaboration and clear communication go hand in hand—and we have to be deliberate about both.

Systems Change Explained Kippy Joseph

 

Kippy Joseph, former Associated Director at Rockefeller Foundation

The Rockefeller Foundation, [1998-2013]. All rights reserved. Originally Published on https://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/blog

Holistic Development

Holistic Development

“Because mindsets and paradigms guide behaviors, changing them can have a profound impact… People who manage to intervene in systems at the level of paradigm hit a leverage point that totally transform systems.”
— Donna Meadows, lead author, Limits to Growth²

 1. Beyond GDP: Towards SDGs and Wellbeing.

While development efforts showcase success stories, such as the decrease in the number of people living in extreme poverty, the current paradigm is unable to fully explain successes and failures of development interventions. As we increasingly live beyond our planetary boundaries, inequality and mental health issues have been rising, and happiness and wellbeing remain elusive for many around the world.

Furthermore, given the number of crises — from climate change to COVID19 — alongside the ambitious nature of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), there is an urgent need to investigate the effectiveness of the 20th-century human development paradigm for the 21st century.

While the current human development approach shifted the development focus from Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to a somewhat broader perspective some 30 years ago, we have not made major progress since to truly advance human development in a holistic manner.

Calls for a more holistic human development paradigm are supported by the Beyond GDP movement as well as other wellbeing initiatives around the world,³ and the need has also been recognized by the United Nations’ General Assembly (resolution 65/309: Happiness: towards a holistic approach to development, 2011). Global mindsets are very similar to paradigms in that they are the source of manifesting systems. As Achim Steiner, UNDP’s Administrator stated:

“We are now on the verge of shifting into an economic paradigm that is not about communism or capitalism; it is about recalibrating equity and sustainability into a development paradigm.” ⁴

 

 2. Key Questions 

Based on the need to rethink human development, the following key questions come to mind:

How can we shift towards a holistic development mindset that advances physical, emotional, mental and spiritual wellbeing?

Are we willing to leapfrog to an enlightened paradigm that recognizes and develops humans as multi-dimensional beings?

How to harmoniously advance the wellbeing of both people and the planet?

We protect and develop what we cherish, what we feel part of and connected with. Therefore, how can we nurture three essential connections: with our inner being, our communities and Mother Nature? The opportunity to create a new paradigm for the 21st century comes from combining current science with timeless wisdom. Could the root causes and transformative power of human development be within us?

 3. Inspiration from Bhutan 

Some countries have not fallen into the trap of blindly pursuing GDP and materialistic growth. The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) awarded Bhutan with a Special Award of Recognition for holistically advancing human development in 2019.⁵ Bhutan famously declared Gross National Happiness (GNH) to be more important than GDP.

GNH is a holistic and sustainable approach to development, which is based on 9 pillars that balance material and non-material values.

Human Development

It is noteworthy that GNH is not to be confused with a shallow understanding of fleeting happiness. Rather, GNH is a multi-dimensional approach which some argue is more holistic than the SDGs, given that it also entails dimensions such as psychological wellbeing, time use, community vitality, amongst others. The COVID19 crisis has amplified the importance of mental health.

Even before the crisis began, a staggering 800,000 people die due to suicide every year globally.⁶

Furthermore, Bhutan is heralded as a global example of a carbon-negative country that lives in harmony with nature. It is a biodiversity hotspot and is often seen as a leader in sustainable tourism. Its strong emphasis on health and protecting communities is seen as a success factor and has allowed the country to notably handle the COVID19 crisis.

It is evident that Bhutan’s enlightened development approach and leadership has led to extraordinary poverty reduction while protecting the environment.⁷

“Our generation is called upon to rethink, to redefine the true purpose of growth and, in doing so, to find a growth that is truly sustainable.

We must never forget that, for lasting peace and happiness in this world, the journey forward has to be one that we must all make together… It all starts with leadership of the self”.⁸— His Majesty the 5th King of Bhutan, 2011

 4. The Blind Spot: Mindsets 

The strong focus of development assistance on external factors and measurable progress has left aside an understanding of internal factors and potential hidden root causes. Internal factors such as mindsets can play a transformative role in people’s, nations’ and humanity’s development journey.

While there has been researching on behavioural insights, self-empowerment, personal development, leadership and transformation in some specialized fields such as psychology, sociology, philosophy and neuroscience, there has been no — or minimal — direct connections made to human development approaches. There is indeed a significant knowledge gap on inner dimensions, which are more difficult to measure — such as people’s mindsets.

These ‘soft’ inner factors have, so far, not been well considered in the field of human development, in contrast to ‘hard’ indicators such as income levels, life expectancy and years of education.

This underscores the need for a new holistic approach that takes the interaction between internal and external factors into account, for development to be transformative and advance sustainable wellbeing for people and planet. As Nobel peace prize winner Prof. Muhammad Yunus illuminates: “Unless we change our mind we cannot change the world.” ⁹

 

 5. The Key Role of Mindsets 

Mindsets are the invisible leverage point to be included in a new 21st-century human development paradigm. Mindsets are made up of our deep beliefs, attitudes and values; they frame our thinking and therefore determine our behaviour, life experiences and journey.

They influence how people lead their lives, how they vote, what personal, educational and professional opportunities they pursue, and what they make out of crises, challenges and opportunities. Even national policies and global development goals spring off national and global mindsets.

For example, during the COVID19 crisis, we can perceive staying at home as being forced into lock-down or consider it as voluntarily protecting our vulnerable elderly. Mindsets are not, of course, a panacea and external factors should not be negated altogether.

However, by acknowledging the role of inner dimensions, foremost mindsets, we emphasize the agency that people have in realizing their true human potential. History is full of change-makers and social leaders who have overcome and changed their external circumstances and structures and therefore written history.

 

 6. Need for a Global Mindset Shift: Holistic Development for Planetary Wellbeing.

It is widely accepted that the SDGs cannot be achieved by business as usual. For behaviour and actions to be different, they require a new way of thinking, a new mindset and a sense of urgency for transformational change. The urgency to shift towards a development paradigm that finally translates the ‘beyond-GDP’ aspiration into a wellbeing and sustainability mindset with its corresponding concept and measurements are increasing.¹⁰

In systems thinking and leadership, shifting mindsets is considered the highest leverage point to change a system, even higher than policies and goals. Shifting the global mindset towards a wellbeing economy can be inspired by examples from Bhutan, Costa Rica and New Zealand, amongst others.

This indeed also reflects the call by UN Deputy Secretary-General for a “New paradigm shift to replace the traditional sustainable development approach to realize the 2030 Agenda”.¹¹

 

 7. Suggestions for Mindset Shifts. 

While we are largely unaware of mindsets due to their intangible nature, mindsets can be changed. Pressing issues such as greed, violence and discrimination also start in our mind, and in the minds and hearts are the keys to transformational development.
Six mindset shifting suggestions:

1. Sustainable transformation happens from the inside out.
2. Mindsets matter. They play an important role in human development at the individual, collective and global level.
3. Mindsets can be shifted by increasing awareness, fostering self-reflection and self-responsibility.
3. Solutions need to be co-created which requires a mindset shift of development practitioners themselves.
4. Current development approaches are too materialistic; therefore they need to move beyond overly focusing on GDP and economic development.
5. A new holistic development paradigm should include inner, collective and planetary wellbeing.

While the above-mentioned points indicate the important role of mindsets, there is a blind spot in the academic and development literature. This calls for further research exploring the role that mindsets play in human development, towards sustainability, transformation and wellbeing for people and planet.

 

Holistic Development for wellbeing Jürgen Nagler – @NaglerUNDP

Guest Commentator at The Global School for Social Leaders

About the Author:
Jürgen Nagler is the UNDP Deputy Resident Representative in Bhutan. He has over 20 years’ experience in successfully delivering global, regional and field projects with the UNDP, UN Global Compact, international NGOs and private sector.

He joined the United Nations after a 10-year career with international companies and founding an international grassroots NGO. He completed first-class Bachelors in Business Administration (Germany) and Masters in International Development (Australia).
Jürgen has a passion for transformative development towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and is researching the role of mindsets for holistic human development, in a personal capacity. Jürgen can be contacted at jjnagler[at]gmail.com.

Credit:

This article was originally published for the International Science Council and UNDP’s Human Development Report Office global experts’ call for new perspectives on human development.


Forthcoming Study on Mindsets

If you would like to receive a free copy of a mindsets study, which will be published in 2021, please register at www.wellbeingmindset.org.


Addendum: Wellbeing Mindset

What is a wellbeing mindset? Following the publication of this article, I’ve developed the following working definition, feedback welcome: “A wellbeing mindset means the whole of attitudes, believes and values of a person or group of people that fosters wellbeing. Wellbeing of a person, group of people, the whole of humanity, other sentient beings such as animals, and/or planet Earth.


References:

  1. 1. Attributed to multiple wisdom teachers, foremost the Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama. See a similar translation for the Buddha at Easwaran, Eknath (2007), “The Dhammapada: Classics of Indian Spirituality.”
  2. 2. Meadows, Donella (1999). “Leverage Points: Places to Intervene in a System.”
  3. 3. For example see the global Wellbeing Economy Alliance and EU’s Beyond GDP initiative
  4. 4. Steiner, Achim, 2020, These 4 trends will define the future of development
  5. 5. UNDP presents His Majesty the King of Bhutan a Special Award of Recognition
  6. 6. WHO Suicide Data
  7. 7. For more information see What happiness can teach us about how we measure human developmentBhutan’s Unique Success in Reducing Poverty and What tiny Bhutan can teach the world about being carbon negative
  8. 8. His Majesty the King’s Speech at Keio University, Japan
  9. 9. Yunus, Muhammad (2019), Address to the Social Business Forum 2019.
  10. 10. Stiglitz, Fitoussi, Durand (2019): Measuring What Counts: The Global Movement for Well-Being
  11. 11.  UN DSG Mohammed (2019): New Paradigm Shift to Replace Traditional Sustainable Development Approach