Social Innovation Canvas

Social Innovation Canvas

How does it work?

The Social Innovation Canvas is a business model framed in canvas, it aims to provide the bases of a structured social innovation project. 

Section 1

Divided into 3 big sections:

SECTION 1.

i. The Problem,

ii. Actors,

iii. Solution,

iv. Cost Structure,

 

SECTION 2.

v. Customer Segment,

vi. Revenue Streams & Size,

vii. Emotional & Functional Value Proposition,

SECTION 3.

viii. Channels,

xix. Partners,

x. Impact.

Define the problem (Problem). WHAT, HOW, WHERE, WHEN.

– Intensity. How bad is it?

– Frequency. How frequent is it? 

– Impact. How many are affected?

Actors

A basic systemic approach of the forces behind a problem.

Pushing vs Pulling. Who is being affected by vs who is benefiting from the current status quo?

Pulling: Not willing to change the status quo.

Pushing: Trying to change the status quo.

Possible Solutions: Solutions triple-A

Affordable: 

  • – Is your solution cost / effective? 
  • – Is your solution better than others? how?
  • – Is your solution transparent? 

Accessible:

  • – Is your solution ready to be implemented in reality?
  • – Is your solution simple and easy to understand?

Adaptable: 

  • – Is your solution universally used?  
  • –  Does your solution offer measurable results?
  • – Can your solution scale up?

 

Competitive Solution:

3 A = You have the best solution

2 A = Your solution is good

1 A = Change your solution

0 A = You are the problem!

Example: 

The current price of drinkable water in the suburbs of Yaounde, Camerún.

– Intensity: 7/10

– Frequency: 365 days a year

– Impact:  250 thousand persons a year.

Actors:

Pulling: Water Sellers, Plastic Factories.

Pushing: Farmers, Street Vendors.

Example:

Bottom-up Matching Solution.

A water purifier that reduces the cost per litre of water by 30%, made from recycled ceramic and with a capacity of 15 litres.

Variable Costs:

Costs associated with your level of income. More income, more cost.

Example:

  • – Research and Development 
  • – Marketing.
  • – Supplies.

 

Fix Costs

Costs associated with your operational activity. Constant costs regardless of your income.

Example:

  • – Salary.
  • – Office Rent.
  • – Internet.

 

HOW TO USE IT?

Step 1.

Ask each member of your team to draw a summary of the first section in an A4 paper.

You can use figures, symbols, icons, emojis, anything except words.

Step 2.

Set groups of 4 persons (If applies) for the 1st round of presentations, each member of the team will have 2 mins max. to draw while explaining the results.

After each presentation is finished, ask the rest of your team to evaluate (from 0 to 5) how clear was the presentation? 

 

Step 3.

After the 1st round, give some space to rearrange and improve all the presentations.

Start the 2nd round of presentations. Each member of the team will have 2 mins max. to draw while explaining the results.

After each presentation is finished, ask the rest of the team their feedback.

HOW CAN WE INTERPRET IT?

This first part must be able to clarify the problem, actors, its possible solution and costs.

Points to evaluate:

– The message.
– The level of understanding of the problem.
– The level of understanding of the solution.
– Everyone’s level of attraction.

Through your poster, your design thinking will be stimulated, trying to bring even more clarity to your presentation.

It is clear that there are no simple problems, and complexity is a rule of them, however, this exercise seeks to improve an overview of your project.

If you are tackling a very complex problem, try to focus on the general presentation of it, and save the details for a future presentation.

1. Leadership Self-Assessment. How can assess my leadership skills and capabilities?

2. Finding your purpose (Ikigai + Golden Circle). How can I find and link my purpose with the purpose of my project?

3. Social Innovation Matrix. How can explore problems and possible solutions? 

4. Humanity Development Goals. How can we work with development more holistically?

5. Social Intervention Frame. What is the best intervention to solve a problem?

6. Social Contract. How can design and model a social innovation project?

7. The Social Innovation Canvas. How can design and model a social innovation project?

8. Impact Investor Matrix. How do the investors measure impact on projects?

9. Social Economy. How can I finance my  project beyond traditional financing models?

10. Types of Funding. How can I find the best types of funding for my project?

11. Activist Journey. How can I build a movement to solve a social problem?

12. The Social Leader Storytelling. How can I build a powerful and meaningful message for my project?

13. Kite Customer Relationship Management CRM. How can I sell and raise funds for my project?

14. Team Values. How can I build trust among my stakeholder?

15. Recruitment Venn. How can I attract, keep and communicate with the best team for my project?

16. Productivity Board. How can I work more efficiently if I don´t have a clear work process?

17. OKRs. How can I work more efficiently if I already have work process?

18. Decision-Making. How can I discuss and make better decisions with my team

Section 2

Divided into 3 big sections:

SECTION 1.

i. The problem,

ii. Actors,

iii. Solution,

iv. Cost Structure,

 

SECTION 2.

v. Customer Segment,

vi. Revenue Streams & Size,

vii. Emotional & Functional Value Proposition,

 

SECTION 3.

viii. Channels,

xix. Partners,

x. Impact.

CUSTOMER SEGMENT

Your project must be financially sustainable in order to guarantee its survival, that is why defining your sources of income, or customer segment, or funders, is relevant.

Define and Describe your customer (s):

– What is the mission of your potential client?
– What are the problems that your potential client faces?
– What are the benefits that your potential client is looking for?

Identify at least 3 customer segments.

 

REVENUE STREAM / SIZE

In businesses, an income stream is generally made up of service income. In government, the term revenue stream often refers to different types of taxes.

In an organization to types of donations or contributions.

Cash flow = Stable and frequent income (365 days a year). Example: Direct Sales, Donations or Memberships.

Main Income = An activity that generates more than 50% of the total income of the project.

Example: Impact Investing, Fundraising Campaigns.

Top income = Activity that can be seen as the next stage in your income strategy.

Example: Licenses of use or Franchises.

Establish a percentage or amount in money.

 

EMOTIONAL VALUE PROPOSITION

It refers to what you want to make your client feel with your solution:

Example: Satisfaction, Accomplishment, Success, Security, etc.

Identify at least 3 emotional proposals.

 

 

VALUE PROPOSITION

FUNCTIONAL VALUE PROPOSITION

It refers to what you want to deliver to your client that solves their problems and generates value for their business or project.

Example: Greater impact, Low Cost, Better Quality, Better Process, Innovation, Friendly to the environment, etc.

Identify at least 3 functional proposals.

How to identify value propositions?

 

Mission / Aspiration / Objective

– What is the mission, aspiration or purpose of your client? (Personal, professional, emotional)

– What are the values ​​and objectives that motivate your client?

(For example, increase sales, satisfy a market, etc.)

– What are the problems and needs that your client is trying to solve?

(For example, efficient use of resources, sustainable development objectives, a collaboration between authorities, etc.)

 

Pains / Losses / Annoyances

– What financial and operational challenges does your client face? (for example, lack of efficiency or quality, expensive, lack of training, etc.)

– What social or technical risks does your client face? (for example, loss of influence, confidence or status, financial, technical)

– What is it that keeps your client awake at night? (for example, big problems, worries, etc.)

– What barriers prevent your client from adopting solutions? (for example, initial investment costs, learning curve, resistance to change, etc.)

 

Earnings / Achievements / Satisfactions

– What makes your client’s work or life easier?

(eg flatter learning curve, more services, lower cost of ownership, …)

– What positive social consequences does your client want?

(for example, social acceptance, popularity, reputation, etc.)

– What would increase the probability of choosing your solution?

(eg good design, warranties, cost, financing, etc.)

– How does your client measure success and failure?

(eg performance, cost, impact, etc ..)

– What savings would make your client happy?

(for example, in terms of time, money and effort, …)

– What results does your client expect and what would go beyond their expectations?

(for example, quality level, more of something, less of something, …)

– What are the solutions that currently keep your client happy?

(for example, specific characteristics, performance, quality, etc.

Step 1.

Ask each member of your team to draw a summarize of both sections (1st and 2nd) in an A4 paper.

You can use figures, symbols, icons, emojis, anything except words.

 

Step 2.

Set groups of 4 persons (If applies) for the 3rd round of presentations, each member of the team will have 3 mins max. to draw while explaining the results.

After each presentation is finished, ask the rest of your team to evaluate (from 0 to 5) how clear was the presentation? 

 

Step 3.

After the 3rd round, give some space to rearrange and improve all the presentations.

Start the 4th round of presentations. Each member of the team will have 2 mins max. to draw while explaining the results.

After each presentation is finished, ask the rest of the team their feedback.

HOW TO INTERPRET IT?

These two sections must achieve not only clarity but also the viability of the project.

Points to evaluate:

– The message.
– The level of understanding of the problem.
– The level of understanding of the solution.
– The viability of the project.
– Everyone’s level of attraction.

Through your poster, your design thinking will be stimulated, trying to bring even more clarity to your presentation.

It is clear that there are no simple problems, and complexity is a rule of them, however, this exercise seeks to improve their presentation.

If you are tackling a very complex problem, try to focus on the general presentation of it, and save the details for a future presentation.

1. Leadership Self-Assessment. How can assess my leadership skills and capabilities?

2. Finding your purpose (Ikigai + Golden Circle). How can I find and link my purpose with the purpose of my project?

3. Social Innovation Matrix. How can explore problems and possible solutions? 

4. Humanity Development Goals. How can we work with development more holistically?

5. Social Intervention Frame. What is the best intervention to solve a problem?

6. Social Contract. How can design and model a social innovation project?

7. The Social Innovation Canvas. How can design and model a social innovation project?

8. Impact Investor Matrix. How do the investors measure impact on projects?

9. Social Economy. How can I finance my  project beyond traditional financing models?

10. Types of Funding. How can I find the best types of funding for my project?

11. Activist Journey. How can I build a movement to solve a social problem?

12. The Social Leader Storytelling. How can I build a powerful and meaningful message for my project?

13. Kite Customer Relationship Management CRM. How can I sell and raise funds for my project?

14. Team Values. How can I build trust among my stakeholder?

15. Recruitment Venn. How can I attract, keep and communicate with the best team for my project?

16. Productivity Board. How can I work more efficiently if I don´t have a clear work process?

17. OKRs. How can I work more efficiently if I already have work process?

18. Decision-Making. How can I discuss and make better decisions with my team

Section 3

Divided into 3 big sections:

SECTION 1.

i. The problem,

ii. Actors,

iii. Solution,

iv. Cost Structure,

 

SECTION 2.

v. Customer Segment,

vi. Revenue Streams & Size,

vii. Emotional & Functional Value Proposition,

 

SECTION 3.

viii. Channels,

xix. Partners,

x. Impact.

CHANNELS

The purpose of any channel of distribution is to bridge the gap between the producer of a product and the user of it, whether the parties are located in the same community or in different countries thousands of miles apart.

The channel of distribution is defined as the most efficient and effective manner in which to place a product into the hands of the customer.

A channel performs three important functions.

  • – Transactional functions: buying, selling, and risk assumption
  • – Logistical functions: assembly, storage, sorting, and transportation
  • – Facilitating functions: post-purchase service and maintenance, financing, information dissemination, and channel coordination or leadership.

These functions are necessary for the effective flow of product and title to the customer and payment back to the producer.

 

Types of Channels

There are basically 3 types of marketing channels:

Direct: Directly from your store to your customer. E.g.. Your own Shop.

Indirect; Through intermediaries; E.g. Reseller.

Non-traditional: Which comprehends combination of  both, and new emerging every day thanks to the digital economy, such as: 

  • 1. Dual distribution,
  • 2. Reverse channels,
  • 3. Intensive,
  • 4. Selective, 
  • 5. Exclusive,

 

Direct  & Indirect

Direct is the marketing and selling of products or services directly to consumers away from a fixed retail location. Peddling is the oldest form of direct selling.

Modern direct selling includes sales made through the party plan, one-on-one demonstrations, personal contact arrangements as well as internet sales.

Indirect: Or selling through intermediaries, is a marketing channel where intermediaries such as wholesalers and retailers are utilized to make a product available to the customer.

The most indirect channel you can use (Producer/manufacturer –> agent –> wholesaler –> retailer –> consumer) is used when there are many small manufacturers and many small retailers and an agent is used to helping coordinate a large supply of the product.

 

Non-Traditional

Dual Distribution

Dual distribution describes a wide variety of marketing arrangements by which the manufacturer or wholesalers uses more than one channel simultaneously to reach the end-user.

They may sell directly to the end-users as well as sell to other companies for resale. Using two or more channels to attract the same target market can sometimes lead to channel conflict.

An example of dual distribution is business format franchising, where the franchisors, license the operation of some of its units to franchisees while simultaneously owning and operating some units themselves.

Reverse Channels 

Three public trash cans that are used for recycling.

Recycling Containers: Recycling is an example of a reverse marketing channel.

If you’ve read about the other three channels, you would have noticed that they have one thing in common — the flow. Each one flows from producer to intermediary (if there is one) to consumer.

Technology, however, has made another flow possible. This one goes in the reverse direction and may go — from consumer to intermediary to the beneficiary.

Think of making money from the resale of a product or recycling.

There is another distinction between reverse channels and the more traditional ones — the introduction of a beneficiary. In reverse flow, you won’t find a producer.

You’ll only find a User or a Beneficiary.

 

Intensive Distribution.

As many outlets as possible. The goal of the intensive distribution is to penetrate as much of the market as possible.

 

Selective Distribution.

Select outlets in specific locations. This is often based on a particular good and its fit within a store. Doing this allows manufacturers to pick a price point that targets a specific market of consumer, therefore providing a more customized shopping experience. Selective distribution caps the number of locations in a particular area.

 

Exclusive Distribution.

Limited outlets. This is exclusive to special, limited editions or available only in particular locations or stores. This method helps maintain a brand’s image and product reputation.

 

Examples:

Solution: Water purifier that reduces the cost per litre of water by 30%, made out of recycled materials and with a 15-litre capacity.

Direct Channel: Sales Agents and Internet Sales.

Indirect Channel: Wholesale Distributors or Stores Specialized in Solutions for the Home, Shops, Food Industry.

Non-Traditional Channel: Catalogs with different designs distributed in select stores.

 

Partners or Allies

My Partners are not my clients. 

  1. 1. Does my potential partner reduce the cost of my project?
  2. 2. Does my potential partner improve my communication & distribution channel?
  3. 3. Does my potential partner increase my value proposition?

 

Examples:

Solution: Water purifier that reduces the cost per litre of water by 30%, made out of recycled materials and with a 15-litre capacity.

– REDUCE COST: Shared manufacturing workshop, reduces cost in rent.
– BEST COMMUNICATION AND DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL: Government, provides an official communication and improves access to my potential clients.
– IMPROVED VALUE PROPOSAL: Penitentiaries where inmates learn to develop these products, increasing my social impact.

There are many models of impact measurement, however, we propose a measurement based on the Humanity Development Goals:

What is the impact of your project on a Personal, Social and Environmental level?

Step 1.

Ask each member of your team to draw a summarize of all the sections (1st, 2nd, and 3rd) in an A4 paper.

You can use figures, symbols, icons, emojis, anything except words.

 

Step 2.

Set groups of 4 persons (If applies) for the 4th  round of presentations, each member of the team will have 3 mins max. to draw while explaining the results.

After each presentation is finished, ask the rest of your team to evaluate (from 0 to 5) how clear was the presentation? 

 

Step 3.

After the 4th round, give some space to rearrange and improve all the presentations.

Start the 5th round of presentations. Each member of the team will have 3 mins max. to draw while explaining the results.

After each presentation is finished, ask the rest of the team their feedback.

 

HOW TO INTERPRET IT?

These two sections must achieve not only clarity but also the viability of the project.

Points to evaluate:

– The message.
– The level of understanding of the problem.
– The level of understanding of the solution.
– The viability of the project.
– Everyone’s level of attraction.

Through your poster, your design thinking will be stimulated, trying to bring even more clarity to your presentation.

It is clear that there are no simple problems, and complexity is a rule of them, however, this exercise seeks to improve their presentation.

If you are tackling a very complex problem, try to focus on the general presentation of it, and save the details for a future presentation.

1. Leadership Self-Assessment. How can assess my leadership skills and capabilities?

2. Finding your purpose (Ikigai + Golden Circle). How can I find and link my purpose with the purpose of my project?

3. Social Innovation Matrix. How can explore problems and possible solutions? 

4. Humanity Development Goals. How can we work with development more holistically?

5. Social Intervention Frame. What is the best intervention to solve a problem?

6. Social Contract. How can design and model a social innovation project?

7. The Social Innovation Canvas. How can design and model a social innovation project?

8. Impact Investor Matrix. How do the investors measure impact on projects?

9. Social Economy. How can I finance my  project beyond traditional financing models?

10. Types of Funding. How can I find the best types of funding for my project?

11. Activist Journey. How can I build a movement to solve a social problem?

12. The Social Leader Storytelling. How can I build a powerful and meaningful message for my project?

13. Kite Customer Relationship Management CRM. How can I sell and raise funds for my project?

14. Team Values. How can I build trust among my stakeholder?

15. Recruitment Venn. How can I attract, keep and communicate with the best team for my project?

16. Productivity Board. How can I work more efficiently if I don´t have a clear work process?

17. OKRs. How can I work more efficiently if I already have work process?

18. Decision-Making. How can I discuss and make better decisions with my team

Social Innovation Box

10 years of REAL field experience in more than 20 countries across 4 continents, compacted in a powerful tool-box with practical and easy to use tools.

Social Innovation Box

Physical:  €129 

€77.40

Digital: €39

€23.40

Use Coupon: INNOVATION2020

We are a multi-awarded NGO based in Vienna, Austria and Berlin, Germany, specialised in designing purpose-driven education and consulting. 

FAQ

What is inside your Social Innovation Box?

More than 200 tools, tips, resources and information for boosting your career as a social entrepreneur or consultant.

We use the power of design thinking to efficiently solve problems. Used for Amateurs and Experienced.

1. Posters,

2. Guidebook,

3. Notebook,

4. Post it & Pen,

5. A surprise!

 

Who can use it?

Social Innovation Box is an effort to facilitate learning and collaboration with the use of easy-to-use tools, it doesn´t requires previous experience in order to apply methods, tools, practices and intelligence:

Amateurs and Experienced.

1. Coaches and Consultants,

2. NGOs

3. Socially Responsible Entrepreneurs and Companies,

4. Startups,

5. Activists,

6. Researchers and / or Educational Institutions,

7. Government,

You can explore it on your own (1 person) or with your team or students (recommended up to 20 people at the same time).

Estimated Time of Arrival?

From July 25th. 2020

Once you pay, you will receive a confirmation email where you will be asked to fill in a form, your responses helps us to correctly confirm your shipping address, and to improve your experience and entry into the community.

Between 5 to 10 days within the European Union.

Between 15 to 30 days to the rest of the world (Due to delays caused by COVID-19).

Do you offer a discount?

Sure! Get an extra discount of - € 10 euros per box, if your minimum order is 10 boxes.

Can we order more than 20?

Our production capacity is 10 to 15 boxes per day.

If your order exceeds 15 boxes, the waiting time for delivery increases 2 days for every 15 extra boxes.

If your order exceeds 10 boxes, you will get a discount of - € 10 euros per box.

Dimensions and Weight?

Dimensions: 33 x 24 x 4.4 cm

Weight: Approx. 2 kgs.

 

Can I become a distributor?

Sure! If you have access to a large market with a distribution already built, we can grant you distribution rights at a preferential cost.

Do you want to become a Certified Consultant?

You can become a certified consultant in the use, facilitation and application of the Social Innovation Box.

This will allow you to offer high quality consulting, training and workshops for:

NGOs, Socially Responsible Companies, Entrepreneurs, Startups, Government, Activists, Educational Institutions, etc.

Backed and certified by The Global School for Social Leaders.

Send us an email with a short professional summary to: hello@theglobal.school

Leaders in the field back the social innovation box up

Years of Research & Development

Countries where it has been applied

The best is the connnection

The best of this experience is not only to be around the coaches and mentors but the entrepreneurs who are here sharing their dreams.

Gabriel Ekman - Sweden

Enlightening

Sebastian - theglobal.schoo

The experience has been very enlightening and inspirational, recommended for those who are willing to challenge the status quo

Sebastian Baayel - Ghana
African Entrepreneurship and Innovation Centre

Remarkable

Thanks for all the tools, but above all for the remarkable change-makers who I can call now my friends

Natalia Lever - Mexico

Well prepared

Inspiring presentations, well prepared, insightful, interactive and easy to work with.

Liana Taylor - Germany

They have worked with the Social Innovation Box